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THE DIFFERENCE IN LEFT AND RIGHT COMMON CAROTID ARTERY INTIMAL MEDIAL THICKNESS MAY BE EXPLAINED BY THE VELOCITIES.

Abstract Information  
Abstract Submitter:
Doctor  Matangi  Murray - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Event: EuroPRevent 2010
Status: Accepted
Number: 10211
Title: The difference in left and right common carotid artery intimal medial thickness may be explained by the velocities
Evaluation Topic: 15.00 - Imaging in atherosclerosis
Acronym Abbreviation:  
Acronym:  
On Behalf of:  
Category: Not Member of EACPR
Options: No Options
 
Abstract Authors    
B. Parfrey1, D. Armstrong1, M. Nault1, D. Brouillard1, M. Matangi1 - (1) Kingston Heart Clinic, Kingston, Canada
 
Abstract Content 100%  
Purpose. It is well documented that L) common carotid artery (CCA) intimal medial thickness (IMT) is mildly thicker than R) CCA IMT, even in individuals with completely normal carotid studies. We believe there may be an anatomical explanation. The purpose of our investigation was to determine whether or not there was a difference in CCA velocities between L) and R) CCA that may account for the difference in CCA IMT between the two sides.
Methods. CAROTIDfile the carotid duplex imaging module of CARDIOfile, our cardiology database was searched for all patients who had carotid studies with all the necessary data points. All carotid studies were interpreted using Intersocietal Commission for Accredited Vascular Laboratory (ICAVL) imaging and velocity criteria. Patients were separated into those with an ICA stenosis as defined by ICAVL criteria, those without ICA stenosis but who have an abnormal IMT >1.00mm and those without an ICA stenosis who had a normal IMT ≤1.0mm.
Results: The results are shown in Table 1.
Conclusions: Irrespective of the degree (if any) of ICA stenosis, the L) CCA IMT is consistently thicker than the R) CCA. This difference is highly statistically significant. Similarly there is a highly statistically significant difference in the distal CCA peak systolic velocity (PSV). The difference in velocity most likely has an anatomical explanation. The lower PSV in the R) CCA is most likely due to a fall in CCA velocity after the origin of the R) subclavian. We postulate that the statistically significant higher velocity in the L) CCA leads to increased sheer forces and increased risk of L) CCA intimal damage over time. The end result being slightly thicker L) CCA IMT.
Table 1.
  ICA stenosis 1-100% No ICA stenosis No ICA stenosis and IMT <1.0mm

N

977

435

335

R) CCA IMT

1.21±0.62

0.80±0.23

0.72±0.14

L) CCA IMT

1.34±0.69

0.84±0.25

0.74±0.14

P value

<0.0001

<0.005

<0.01

R) CCA PSV

79.3±20.8

84.1±18.1

85.3±18.1

L) CCA PSV

86.7±24.8

88.8±17.6

89.5±17.3

P value

<0.0001

<0.0001

<0.0001

CCA = common carotid artery. PSV = peak systolic velocity in cm/sec. IMT = intimal medial thickness in mm.